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STAY THE COURSE: Reminders for When Assessment Gets Messy

Great post by “Oh, No, It’s an Assessment Blog” providing 5 tips to keep in mind when assessing student learning. They also provide a video from EDUCAUSE discussing Why Assessment is so Difficult?

2015-03-14_OhNoLogo22-abby3My friends for the assessment revolution! My office is gearing up to take the next step in our learning outcomes assessment efforts. I’m VERY excited! It’s going to be fun, intellectually and professionally fulfilling, and (most importantly and hopefully) provide meaningful insight into the student experience. But in addition to excitement, I am also a bit nervous, because, as you’ve likely noticed, measuring for learning is messy – which is the largest part of its difficulty, but, also, its beauty. In my research about student learning and assessment over the past few years I’ve come to learn that it’s not just me who’s feeling this way:

In watching videos like the above and reading anything I can get my hands on, I’m hearing a few common themes (some old, some new) that I’m keeping in mind during this big year for our assessment efforts in the Career Center:

  1. Assess learning not just once, but at multiple different points and from different parts of the student experience. (read: Learning is happening all over campus, thus, assessing learning all over campus is not just a good idea, but needed.)
  2. Give students multiple opportunities to practice their learning in high-touch, intentional, reflection-centric ways. (read: It’s going to take a lot of time, there’s no quick fix, so settle in for the long haul and love the process.)
  3. Assessment tells the story of student learning, but let the student be the narrator. (read: Ask students to narrate their learning and they will tell you! Their story IS your assessment data. Now use that data to tell the larger story of student learning at large.)
  4. Set up assessment to do double duty for you – it can be a learning tool in it of itself, in addition to a data collection. 

    “…a really interesting kind of analytics should reveal to the learner even more possibilities for their own connected learning. The analytics shouldn’t simply be a kind of a diagnosis of what’s happening now but analytics at their best can be a doorway that suggests what else is possible.” -Gardner Campbell, Vice Provost for Learning Innovation and Student Success at Virginia Commonweath University

  5. Follow best practices in assessment while also breaking the mold, because learning’s blessed messiness means it’ll always need more than the gold standard. (read: Follow and break the “rules” of assessment at the same time – simple, right????)

It might be a messy year in assessment, but that’s ok, because it’s a worthwhile pursuit. And as my supervisor reminded me when I was wigging out about it recently: remember, nothing ventured, nothing gained.

So commit to the adventure and just do it.


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For more information please contact Shaqunia Clark.
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